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cannabis oil without a prescription

They tend to only contain very small amounts of CBD, so it’s not clear what effect they would have.

A hospital specialist might consider prescribing medical cannabis if:

But in reality, most products will contain a certain amount of THC.

What about products available to buy?

Many people having chemotherapy will have periods where they feel sick or vomit.

Possessing cannabis is illegal, whatever you’re using it for. That includes medical use unless it has been prescribed for you.

Generally, the more THC the product contains, the greater these risks are.

And it is only likely to be prescribed for a small number of patients.

She says it’s not clear what info the TGA wants, but if it’s expecting companies to run clinical trials then it could be a five-year wait for products.

According to Cassandra Hunt from Fresh Leaf Analytics, the TGA could also be trying to move CBD users away from the black market.

The Australian Medical Association (AMA) doesn’t support the TGA’s decision to down-schedule low-dose CBD oil.

Medical Association “surprised” by down-scheduling

She says this will make life much easier for people who want to use this drug.

She also says that for the first time, as the cost of medical cannabis production comes down, legal products are reaching price parity with the illegal market.

“Medical practitioners have only been prescribing CBD products for a few years, the evidence is still emerging, more education around its use is required,” the AMA said.

Cassandra from Fresh Leaf Analytics admits evidence of how well these products work is hard to come by but agrees they’re not harmful.

Accessibility of CBD products was examined in the USA, Canada, Germany, Ireland, United Kingdom, Switzerland, Japan, Australia, and New Zealand as of May 2020. Regulatory and other relevant documents were obtained from government agency websites and related sources. Relevant commercial websites and some physical retailers were visited to verify access to CBD-containing products and the nature of the products available.

Recent legislative change has allowed increased access to cannabis products in many jurisdictions. In some locations, this includes over-the-counter (OTC) and/or online access to products containing cannabidiol (CBD), a non-intoxicating cannabinoid with therapeutic properties. Here we compared the availability of CBD products and the associated legislative and regulatory background in nine selected countries.

Methods

A range of CBD products appeared to be accessible without prescription in seven out of nine countries reviewed. Australia and New Zealand were the exceptions where clinician prescription was required to access any CBD-containing product. CBD products commonly available without prescription included oils, gel capsules, purified crystal and topical products. The daily recommended doses with orally administered non-prescription products were typically well below 150 mg and substantially lower than the doses reported to have therapeutic effects in published clinical trials (e.g., 300-1500 mg). The legal foundations enabling access in several countries were often unclear, with marketed products sometimes failing to meet legal requirements for sale. There was an obvious disparity between federal directives and available products in both the USA and European countries examined.

There are a variety of approaches in how countries manage access to CBD products. Many countries appear to permit OTC and online availability of CBD products but often without legislative clarity. As consumer demand for CBD escalates, improved legislation, guidelines and quality control of CBD products would seem prudent together with clinical trials exploring the therapeutic benefits of lower-dose CBD formulations.