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cbd negative side effects

You take prescription drugs. (Could be important) Pharmaceutical drugs are processed by your body in different ways; some are less effective after processing, while others aren’t effective until after they’ve been processed. Similar to grapefruits, CBD can occupy enzymes (cytochrome p450) that your body uses to process certain pharmaceutical drugs. Taking CBD alongside these pharmaceuticals could pose a health risk by either increasing or decreasing levels of these medications in your bloodstream. If you currently take prescription drugs — particularly *any that come with a warning not to consume with grapefruit* such as warfarin, anti-epileptics, HIV antivirals, chemotherapy and others — we suggest speaking with a medical professional before incorporating CBD into your wellness routine. They could help you understand potential interactions and how to proceed.

You’re immune compromised. (Most evidence disproves this concern) CBD is known as an immunomodulator because it can calm down a hyperactive immune system , but some worry this could harm people whose immune systems are already impaired, like HIV sufferers. Although we don’t have evidence specifically testing CBD against this fear, many studies have been done using the whole cannabis plant. Research shows that cannabis helps relieve pain and other HIV-related symptoms without causing severe side effects . And when marijuana is tested against specific HIV symptoms like liver fibrosis, cannabinoids do not appear to worsen it . Although current evidence suggests that CBD could be more helpful than harmful for immune-compromised individuals, the jury is still out.

Clinical evidence for CBD oil

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So we thought we’d compile all the negative scientific evidence into one handy guide, to help you decide whether CBD is right for you. We’ll cover the different side effects you might encounter and what they could mean, as well as what current research says about trying CBD if you are:

So yes, you may be jumping the gun by taking CBD to address a health issue when its use is not yet supported by clinical evidence that would pass muster with the FDA. But that clinical evidence won’t be available any time soon, and many people don’t want to wait a decade before finding out for themselves if CBD is effective for their needs.

Sometimes CBD products don’t contain any CBD at all — in which case you won’t experience any effects, positive or negative.

If you check the US government’s clinical trials database , you’ll see that more than 50 trials are either currently active or recruiting participants for conditions ranging from arthritis to drug abuse disorders. (Foria is participating in this movement with a 400-person study on the efficacy of our CBD suppositories for menstrual cramps and pain — although this isn’t a clinical trial, but a less-expensive self-reported survey.)

Here are a few tips to help you find the best CBD oil:

Meredith Bull, ND, is a licensed naturopathic doctor with a private practice in Los Angeles, California.

There are no guidelines for the appropriate use of CBD oil. CBD oil is usually delivered sublingually (under the tongue). Most oils are sold in 30-milliliter (mL) bottles with a dropper cap.

What to Look For

CBD oil can interact with certain medications, including some drugs used to treat epilepsy. CBD inhibits an enzyme called cytochrome P450 (CYP450), which metabolizes certain drugs. By interfering with CYP450, CBD may either increase the toxicity or decrease the effectiveness of these drugs.

CBD oil may benefit those with drug addiction, suggests a 2015 review of studies published in Substance Abuse.

CBD oil may also increase liver enzymes (a marker of liver inflammation). People with liver disease should use CBD oil with caution, ideally under the care of a doctor who can regularly check blood liver enzyme levels.

Proponents claim that CBD oil can treat a wide variety of health problems, including: