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cbd oil and ms

Cannabis is made up of compounds called cannabinoids. The main ones studied for their therapeutic effect are tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which gets you ‘high’, and cannabidiol (CBD), which doesn’t.

There’s a medically approved cannabis-based treatment called Sativex, but it doesn’t work for everyone. In England and Wales you can get it on the NHS for ‘moderate’ to ‘severe’ spasticity (muscle spasms and stiffness). But you can have it only if other treatments haven’t worked. As of late 2019 it’s not yet available in Scotland or Northern Ireland but we hope it soon will be.

In November 2018, the Government legalised cannabis for medicinal use, but also put a strict criteria in place for who could access it. Only specialist doctors are allowed to prescribe medicinal cannabis, and so far only a handful of people have benefited from the change in law.

One in five people with MS we surveyed in 2014 told us they’d used cannabis to help with their symptoms. They said it can help with muscle spasms or stiffness (spasticity) and pain.

Some people with MS use cannabis in a variety of ways to help ease their symptoms.

Ultimately, most MS sufferers couldn’t care less what kind of treatment they take, or where it comes from. The only thing that matters to them is whether or not the medication is effective, and to what extent it allows them to live a normal life. Those who seek alternative treatments like CBD oil generally do so for one of the following reasons:

If there is an absence or deficiency in the production of these endocannabinoids, the receptors will not be able to function properly. And it just so happens that the central nervous system is the region of the body that’s most densely populated with cannabinoid receptors – the same region where multiple sclerosis attacks nerve fibers.

Also, contrary to popular belief, multiple sclerosis is not necessarily a terminal disease. While in some instances the disease is degenerative (meaning it gets worse over time) and ends in death, the average lifespan of individuals suffering from multiple sclerosis is in fact only marginally shorter than the average US adult lifespan.

CBD Oil for Multiple Sclerosis: Is it the Real Deal?

Although dozens of prescription medications are available, conventional drugs vary in terms of their efficacy. This is largely why the topic of CBD oil for multiple sclerosis is advancing into the limelight. According to preliminary evidence, it may prove a viable treatment option.

Does CBD work for multiple sclerosis? Early research shows promising signs…

In this article, we’ll talk about how MS attacks nerve fibers and disrupts neurological pathways. We’ll also discuss how cannabidiol (CBD) may be able to influence these pathways. While one should not consider CBD oil for multiple sclerosis a cure, it may provide an alternative form of relief.

On the other, more sinister hand, some have said that the fact the drug is patented by the federal government means it’s highly unlikely it’ll ever get into the hands of Big Pharma. Superficially this might seem like a good thing, but at the end of the day all it means is that ‘conventional’ physicians and medical professionals will be unlikely to recognize it as a viable multiple sclerosis treatment.