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cbd oil for ibd

According to the National Institute of Health, CBD has both analgesic (pain-relieving) and anti-inflammatory effects on the gastrointestinal tract without causing intoxication.

Several studies have suggested that CBD and cannabis, in general, are possible medical treatment options for ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, and other inflammatory bowel conditions. Researchers found that CBD could prevent injury in the colon’s lining as well as inflammation, which is the underlying cause of all IBD’s.

How Is Ulcerative Colitis Typically Treated?

If you decide to try CBD for ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease, it’s important to choose a form that will be the most beneficial. CBD is available in oil drops, capsules, edibles, vapes, and topicals; each of these products has different bioavailability, addresses different problems, and suits different types of users.

The patent says, “Cannabinoids have been found to have antioxidant properties… [making them] useful in the treatment of a wide variety of oxidation associated diseases, [including] inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.”

According to the studies mentioned in this article, patients with IBD respond well to amounts such as 50 mg of CBD twice a day. The participants who tolerated the compound well continuously increased their intake up to 250 mg twice per day for ten weeks — without dangerous side effects.

The company prides itself on its transport to all U.S. states and in its freedom from harsh metals, THC and gluten.

To prove confidence in their product, CBDPure offers a 100% money-back guarantee. If you are not happy with the products, return them within 90 days for a refund.

Many people turn to CBD with and without medical advice. Those who may not use CBD may use cannabis to control their pain, weight loss, nausea, and other side-effects of their illness. Cannabis or CBD might play a role in increasing the quality of life for patients with IBD.

CBD Oil Dosage for Crohn’s Disease

emulsion technique that involves breaking down the molecule into smaller, more digestible components.

CBD might help people with IBD manage their health better by decreasing their disease’s symptoms through pain reduction and anti-inflammatory actions. However limited, studies have shown beneficial effects on IBD symptoms in both animals and humans with the use of CBD.

You can take CBD in the form of oils, tinctures, capsules, or applied topically in the form of lotion, balms, or creams. For patients with IBD, the best way to take CBD is orally or through the bloodstream by putting tinctures or oils under the tongue or inhaling the oils’ vapors. One might achieve significant health benefits from incorporating the many CBD products on the market into their lifestyle.

Established in 2018, Spruce is a CBD brand based in Raleigh, North Carolina. The company prides itself on making American-made CBD products and some of the best CBD oils available.

Conclusions

Ulcerative colitis is a chronic, long-term illness that causes inflammation of the colon and rectum. Symptoms may include diarrhea, rectal bleeding, passage of mucus, and abdominal pain. It is characterized by periods of acute flares when people experience symptoms as well as periods of remission when symptoms stop.

Two studies including 92 adult participants with ulcerative colitis were included. Both studies assessed cannabis therapy in participants who had active ulcerative colitis. No studies that assessed cannabis therapy in participants with ulcerative colitis in remission were identified. One study (60 participants) compared 10 weeks of treatment with capsules containing cannabis oil with up to 4.7% D9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) to placebo in participants with mild to moderately active ulcerative colitis. The starting dose of cannabidiol was 50 mg twice daily which was increased, if tolerated, to a target of 250 mg twice daily. The other study (32 participants) compared 8 weeks of treatment with two cannabis cigarettes per day containing 0.5 g of cannabis, corresponding to 11.5 mg THC to placebo cigarettes in participants with ulcerative colitis who did not respond to conventional medical treatment.

The effect of cannabidiol capsules (100 mg to 500 mg daily) compared to placebo on clinical remission and response is uncertain. Clinical remission at 10 weeks was achieved by 24% (7/29) of the cannabidiol group compared to 26% (8/31) in the placebo group (RR 0.94, 95% CI 0.39 to 2.25; low certainty evidence). Clinical response at 10 weeks was achieved in 31% (9/29) of cannabidiol participants compared to 22% (7/31) of placebo patients (RR 1.37, 95% CI 0.59 to 3.21; low certainty evidence). Serum CRP levels were similar in both groups after 10 weeks of therapy. The mean CRP in the cannabidiol group was 9.428 mg/L compared to 7.638 mg/L in the placebo group (MD 1.79, 95% CI -5.67 to 9.25; moderate certainty evidence). There may be a clinically meaningful improvement in quality of life at 10 weeks, measured with the IBDQ scale (MD 17.4, 95% CI -3.45 to 38.25; moderate certainty evidence). Adverse events were more frequent in cannabidiol participants compared to placebo. One hundred per cent (29/29) of cannabidiol participants had an adverse event, compared to 77% (24/31) of placebo participants (RR 1.28, 95% CI 1.05 to1.56; moderate certainty evidence). However, these adverse events were considered to be mild or moderate in severity. Common adverse events included dizziness, disturbance in attention, headache, nausea and fatigue. None (0/29) of the cannabidiol participants had a serious adverse event compared to 10% (3/31) of placebo participants (RR 0.15, 95% CI 0.01 to 2.83; low certainty evidence). Serious adverse events in the placebo group included worsening of UC and one complicated pregnancy. These serious adverse events were thought to be unrelated to the study drug. More participants in the cannabidiol group withdrew due to an adverse event than placebo participants. Thirty-four per cent (10/29) of cannabidiol participants withdrew due to an adverse event compared to 16% (5/31) of placebo participants (RR 2.14, 95% CI 0.83 to 5.51; low certainty evidence). Withdrawls in the cannabidiol group were mostly due to dizziness. Withdrawals in the placebo group were due to worsening UC.

We searched MEDLINE, Embase, WHO ICTRP, AMED, PsychINFO, the Cochrane IBD Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, ClinicalTrials.Gov and the European Clinical Trials Register from inception to 2 January 2018. Conference abstracts and references were searched to identify additional studies.