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cbd oil for osteoarthritis

But now, there is.

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What’s the evidence that CBD is effective for chronic arthritis pain?

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There’s a good chance you’ve tried it already: according to a Gallup poll in August of 2019, about 14% of Americans report using CBD products, and the number one reason is pain. The Arthritis Foundation conducted its own poll and found that 29% reported current use of CBD (mostly in liquid or topical form), and nearly 80% of respondents were either using it, had used it in the past, or were considering it. Of those using it, most reported improvement in physical function, sleep, and well-being; of note, a minority reported improvement in pain or stiffness.

Of course, there is anecdotal evidence and testimonials galore, including reports of dramatic improvement by people who tried CBD in its various forms (including capsule, liquid, topical, and spray) for their pain. But we are still waiting for well-designed, scientifically valid, and rigorous clinical trials (such as this one in progress) that are so badly needed to answer the question of just how helpful CBD may be to people with chronic arthritis pain.

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a compound that is found in the cannabis plant. Unlike THC, which is another compound from the same plant, CBD is not psychotropic, and therefore does not create the “high” that the plant is more typically known for.

Lord Jones is a reputable supplier of CBD that ships different products depending on your zip code to ensure that the CBD you are receiving is legal in your state, whether marijuana is legal there or not.

What are the symptoms of osteoarthritis?

The legality of CBD in the United States has caused some confusion regarding CBD’s relation to marijuana. Let’s break it down:

CBD, the non-psychotropic cannabinol of marijuana, is becoming an increasingly popular treatment option and may offer unique benefits for osteoarthritis. It has been shown to attenuate symptoms of pain and inflammation. Considering CBD for osteoarthritis pain? We asked the experts for their advice to help you make an informed decision.

Historically, osteoarthritis has been thought of as a non-inflammatory arthritis, however, recent evidence showcases the role of inflammation in the symptoms of OA, as well as in the condition’s progression. Intervention with CBD may offer an opportunity to slow the progression of OA by decreasing inflammation, both systematically and locally. The interaction of CBD with your immune system and its potential antioxidant affect may help to decrease symptoms associated with OA and improve quality of life.