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cbd oil for seizures in adults

Hemp derived extract was given to 138 patients for epileptic seizures [14] . Sixty-eight percent of the study respondents reported decreased seizure severity or frequency from the effects of CBD. About 2/3 reported other effects of CBD such as better sleep and improved alertness. Adverse events were reported by 22% and included diarrhea, fatigue, and increased seizures.

The two main cannabinoid treatments for seizure are THC and CBD. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) only recognizes Epidiolex, a purified CBD isolate, as an approved form of treatment for two forms of epilepsy, Dravet Syndrome & Lennox Gastaut Syndrome (LGS). Gastaut Syndrome and Dravet Syndrome [6] are each a form of epilepsy where using CBD has been shown to make a significant positive difference for many people.

CBD restores normal brain rhythms. It does not do this by a direct effect on cannabinoid receptors, however. It acts via the endocannabinoid system. CBD antagonizes the GPR55 receptor at excitatory synapses [4] in the brain and inhibits the chemical messengers thus calming seizure activity. The GPR55 receptor is one of the endocannabinoid receptors involved in CBD communication between cells and are part of the endocannabinoid system.

Best CBD Oil for Epilepsy

The product line is widely diverse from those supplements made for pets to those for the rest of us like tinctures, oils, drinkable shots, sublingual strips in fun flavors, and capsules.

CBD desensitizes TRPV1 channels. The TRPV1 channels determine how your body experiences pain and are located throughout your central nervous system and brain. People who have epilepsy have more TRPV1 receptors in the temporal lobes of their brains than those who do not have epilepsy.

Epilepsy is the most common pathology of the brain [11] accounting for 1% of the worldwide burden for this disease. Diagnosis can be difficult and would be made easier if a reliable set of biomarkers for this disease could be agreed upon. Though seizures are characteristic of all types of epilepsy other common symptoms may include muscle jerking, staring, loss of consciousness, weakness, and anxiety.

Many studies show possible anti-seizure activity by CBD. Although the exact mechanism is unclear, its effects appear to be multifaceted acting on a number of different endocannabinoid targets including the GPR55 and TRVP receptors.

A prescription for medicinal cannabis would only be given when all other treatment options have been tried or are considered unsuitable, and would only be given if the doctor considers it to be in your best interests.

There is also no good scientific evidence to support suggestions that the addition of THC in combination with CBD increases the efficacy of cannabis-based medicinal products for children.

Concerns have also been raised about the effect of THC on the developing brain in children and young people. Evidence suggests that chronic exposure to THC can affect brain development, structure and mental health.

Getting a prescription for medicinal cannabis

CBD does not contain any significant amount of THC, the component of cannabis associated with producing a ‘high’.

While some studies have also suggested that THC may have an anti-epileptic effect, animal studies suggest it can also trigger seizures. There is no evidence from randomised controlled clinical trials for products with higher proportions of THC (more than 0.2 per cent).

The BPNA also recommends that where children are already taking other cannabis-based products that contain higher proportions of THC, they should be transitioned on to CBD until strong evidence for these products can be produced through clinical trials.

There is also a wide range of other cannabis products available on the internet and in some commercial outlets such as health food outlets and from cannabis ‘dispensaries’ internationally. These products are of unknown quality and contain CBD and THC in varying quantities and proportions.