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cbd oil kroger ohio

Ohio retailers have pulled CBD products from their shelves – or been asked to pull them by local officials – in recent months.

Rachel Hurst, corporate affairs manager for the Kroger Michigan division told the Detriot Free Press will begin selling cannabidiol-infused products at stores in several states.

CBD, also known as cannabidiol, is derived from cannabis (Cannabis sativa L.) and its components.

What is CBD oil?

CBD will likely not hit Ohio shelves at the same time as it will in Kentucky and Indiana.

“CBD is a naturally-occurring and non-intoxicating compound that has promising benefits and is permitted within federal and state regulations. Our limited selection of hemp-derived CBD topical products is from suppliers that have been reviewed for quality and safety,” a statement from Kroger said.

The Food and Drug Administration said CBD-infused products run the gamut of human drugs, dietary supplements, conventional foods, animal foods and drugs, and cosmetics.

You could soon buy CBD oil at Kentucky Kroger stores, according to the Cincinnati-based grocery giant, but you will have to wait to buy it in Ohio.

CBD is the non-psychoactive chemical found in marijuana and does not cause intoxication.

(Reuters) – Kroger Co said on Tuesday it would start selling cannabis-based products in 945 stores, joining the growing number of retailers that are trying to tap the demand for cannabidiol (CBD) products.

The Ohio, Cincinnati-based company will sell products containing hemp-derived CBD such as creams, balms and oils at its stores spread across 17 states, the company said.

Kroger joins retailers like Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc, CVS Health Corp and Vitamin Shoppe Inc in selling CBD products in some of their stores.

Kroger will sell hemp-derived CBD items such as lotions, balms, oils and creams in 945 stores, Kristal Howard, head of corporate communications and media relations at Kroger, said Tuesday. She did not name the brands that will be sold.

The CBD products will be carried at stores in Kroger’s Atlanta, Cincinnati, Columbus, Michigan, Central, Louisville, Delta, Nashville, Mid-Atlantic, Roundy’s (Mariano’s and Pick ‘n Save), Dillons, King Soopers, Fry’s, Fred Meyer, QFC and Smith’s divisions.

Under current law, CBD and THC can’t be added to a food or marketed as a dietary supplement, Sharpless noted.

“Like many retailers, we are starting to offer our customers a highly curated selection of topical products like lotions, balms, oils and creams that are infused with hemp-derived CBD,” Howard said in a statement. “CBD is a naturally occurring and non-intoxicating compound that has promising benefits and is permitted within federal and state regulations. Our limited selection of hemp-derived CBD topical products is from suppliers that have been reviewed for quality and safety.”

“Late last year, the federal scheduling of cannabis changed. The Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018, or the Farm Bill, removed hemp — meaning cannabis or derivatives of cannabis with a very low THC content (below 0.3% by dry weight) — from the CSA’s [Federal Controlled Substances Act’s] definition of marijuana. As a result, while marijuana remains a Schedule I drug, hemp is no longer a controlled substance under federal law,” he explained.