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cbd oil legal in alabama

Although recreational marijuana use is illegal and medicinal use is limited, there are still options for getting CBD oils in Alabama.

Even getting caught with small amounts of marijuana or marijuana concentrate for personal use can land you with a fine of up to $15,000 or one year in jail.

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The Agricultural Act which was introduced in 2014 opened the door for hemp cultivation and the production of industrial hemp CBD oils. The law here can still be murky as it can be difficult to trace the origins of CBD oils and they are only legal if they come from an industrial hemp plant.

Alabama’s marijuana laws are a little tighter when compared to some of the other states (looking at you California and Colorado); however, it is still possible to obtain CBD oils legally.

The laws regarding CBD oils and marijuana in Alabama are complicated.

As the FDA slowly determines the rules around CBD’s legality, the buzzwords and descriptors on a product’s label could raise potential red flags about a product’s quality or content. How a CBD product is labeled and marketed plays a critical role in whether the FDA determines it to be lawful, so it’s important to understand what certain words or numbers indicate.

There are no possession limits on CBD products in Alabama, as long as the product contains no more than 0.3% THC.

The rules and regulations around cannabidiol (CBD) in Alabama seem murky on the surface, yet the Yellowhammer State is one of the most CBD-friendly states in the country. Consumers in Alabama enjoy general access to CBD and CBD products that meet the legal definition as outlined in the 2018 Farm Bill, while licensed Alabama-based growers and processors can create and sell industrial hemp products.

Where to buy CBD in Alabama

Following the 2014 Farm Bill passed by Congress and signed by President Barack Obama, the Alabama Legislature passed the Alabama Industrial Hemp Research Program Act in 2016, tasking the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries (ADAI) with the development of a licensing and inspection program for the production of industrial hemp. The ADAI slowly drafted and finalized regulations in September 2018, only months before the 2018 Farm Bill was signed, which broadly legalized CBD and CBD products that contained less than 0.3% THC by weight.

CBD product labels should not make claims about any therapeutic or medical results, which the FDA would classify as a drug and in violation of current regulations. Reputable CBD companies typically adhere to stricter labeling standards voluntarily to give their consumers better understanding and access to higher-quality products. Buzz words, such as “pure” or “organic,” have no scientific meaning for hemp and could be misleading marketing slogans.

Cannabidiol is a non-intoxicating molecule found in cannabis. It is the second-most abundant-cannabinoid in the plant after THC and has many potential therapeutic benefits, including analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-anxiety, and seizure-suppressant properties. CBD can be sourced from either marijuana or hemp plants.

Alabama consumers can purchase CBD products both in-person and online. Typically, CBD products are sold at CBD-specific shops and wellness and health food stores. In Alabama, pharmacies can sell CBD products over the counter, as long as they are sourced from legal producers and contain no more than 0.3% THC.