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cbd oil to treat ms

DID YOU KNOW? Multiple sclerosis is a rare disease that only affects about 1 in 850 Americans.

This simple fact can be considered in one of two ways. On the one hand, the notion that the cannabinoid is recognized by the National Institute of Health as a neuroprotectant is virtually a signed, sealed, and delivered acknowledgment of its ability to treat multiple sclerosis.

Conventional (Non-Cannabis) MS Treatment Methods and Their Side-Effects

Ultimately, most MS sufferers couldn’t care less what kind of treatment they take, or where it comes from. The only thing that matters to them is whether or not the medication is effective, and to what extent it allows them to live a normal life. Those who seek alternative treatments like CBD oil generally do so for one of the following reasons:

Given the “come and go” nature of multiple sclerosis, patients can go months or even years without diagnosis. In the event of diagnosis, however, prescription meds are typically the treatment of choice. Prescription MS medications include interferons like Avonex and Betaseron, as well as immunomodulators like Copaxone.

The impossibly comical irony of the federal government owning a medically-viable patent to CBD, while maintaining a Schedule I status on the plant that it comes from , is a discussion that will have to wait for another time and another place. Whatever means an MS sufferer might have to go to in order to receive treatment and receive the parts of their life back that the disease took from them, though, is a decidedly small price to pay in the grand scheme of things.

Cannabis is made up of compounds called cannabinoids. The main ones studied for their therapeutic effect are tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which gets you ‘high’, and cannabidiol (CBD), which doesn’t.

In November 2018, the Government legalised cannabis for medicinal use, but also put a strict criteria in place for who could access it. Only specialist doctors are allowed to prescribe medicinal cannabis, and so far only a handful of people have benefited from the change in law.

There’s a medically approved cannabis-based treatment called Sativex, but it doesn’t work for everyone. In England and Wales you can get it on the NHS for ‘moderate’ to ‘severe’ spasticity (muscle spasms and stiffness). But you can have it only if other treatments haven’t worked. As of late 2019 it’s not yet available in Scotland or Northern Ireland but we hope it soon will be.

One in five people with MS we surveyed in 2014 told us they’d used cannabis to help with their symptoms. They said it can help with muscle spasms or stiffness (spasticity) and pain.

Some people with MS use cannabis in a variety of ways to help ease their symptoms.