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cbd olive oil tincture

To consume, simply take a small amount and swallow it, or better yet, apply it under your tongue. And of course, you can cook with the CBD oil in place of any other kind of oil — your meals will become infused with CBD goodness! In all, making your own CBD-infused oil can not only shake up your old CBD routine, but it can also be fun and simple too.

Commercial production of CBD oil is a refined and industrial process, replete with high-tech CO2 extraction equipment and razor-thin profit margins.

CBD oil is sold all over the world by a variety of different manufacturers, each using their own desired cannabis strains and oil types. There are a number of products out there to choose from. Due to so many options, some people say there’s no reason to learn how to make CBD-infused oil yourself.

Step #5 – Cooling & Separating the CBD-infused olive oil

In order to infuse a proper homemade CBD oil, you’ll need to make it from actual cannabis buds. If you don’t really care about the total CBD content of the final product, you can use any variety of cannabis. But if you want to ensure that the final product is a CBD oil (rather than a THC oil), it’s important to know what strain you’re using.

You should be left with a pot of CBD-enriched olive oil and a handful of leftover, still warm cannabis buds.

Anyway, to prepare your bud, you’ll first need to decarboxylate it. Our bodies have trouble processing the principal cannabinoids within cannabis unless they have been decarboxylated, which basically just means they’ve been heated to a certain temperature. (When you smoke weed, the combustion process decarboxylates the compounds “automatically.” If you’re using it in cooking – or in making CBD oil – you’ll need to do it yourself).

To “decarb” the bud, simply put it in on a baking sheet in the oven and set it to roughly 230˚F for about 20 to 30 minutes. You’re looking for the buds to just slightly begin to turn brown, as well as slightly crisp. You don’t want to fully cook it or burn it all.

A carrier oil is an oil that you use for herbal infusions. Coconut oil and MCT oil (which is derived from coconut) are popular carrier oils both in commercial and homemade CBD products.

CBD oil is a non-intoxicating herbal remedy made from hemp flower, another is cannabis honey. It is rich in cannabidiol, a type of compound found in cannabis that has strong anti-inflammatory properties. One of CBD’s benefits is that it conveys the beneficial properties of cannabis without the high since it contains little to no THC.

Many people use CBD oil to reduce inflammation, soothe pain, or improve their body’s response to stress. And it’s super easy to make at home, too. Plus you can use healthy fats and you’ll know exactly what you’re putting into your bottle, avoiding the refined oils and additives that commercial producers sometimes add.

High-CBD hemp flower

Rather than smoking, you can activate these compounds through other means of heating. Some people bake hemp flowers in a slow oven for about an hour or use a slow cooker. These methods are inexpensive, but they’re also imprecise and may not activate all the CBD.

Depending on their strain, cannabis may contain large or relatively low amounts of CBD. When you make CBD oil, choose a strain with a high CBD content so that you can extract the most beneficial compounds into your homemade oil.

To activate CBD efficiently and to get the most from your plant material, you’ll need a precision cooker (also known as a decarboxylator) which can maintain exact temperatures needed for the full activation of CBD and other cannabinoids. With precision heating, decarboxylators extract a higher percentage of beneficial plant compounds than cruder methods and are a worthwhile investment for anyone who takes CBD oil regularly or wants to make a consistently good product.

Where to Find a Decarboxylator. Commercial CBD oil producers use huge decarboxylators capable of activating the cannabinoids in several pounds of cannabis; however, if you’re making it at home, you’ll need a smaller version.