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cbd research studies

CBD is commonly used to address anxiety, and for patients who suffer through the misery of insomnia, studies suggest that CBD may help with both falling asleep and staying asleep.

CBD stands for cannabidiol. It is the second most prevalent of the active ingredients of cannabis (marijuana). While CBD is an essential component of medical marijuana, it is derived directly from the hemp plant, which is a cousin of the marijuana plant. While CBD is a component of marijuana (one of hundreds), by itself it does not cause a "high." According to a report from the World Health Organization, "In humans, CBD exhibits no effects indicative of any abuse or dependence potential…. To date, there is no evidence of public health related problems associated with the use of pure CBD."

Cannabidiol (CBD) has been recently covered in the media, and you may have even seen it as an add-in booster to your post-workout smoothie or morning coffee. What exactly is CBD? Why is it suddenly so popular?

The evidence for cannabidiol health benefits

Some CBD manufacturers have come under government scrutiny for wild, indefensible claims, such that CBD is a cure-all for cancer, which it is not. We need more research but CBD may be prove to be an option for managing anxiety, insomnia, and chronic pain. Without sufficient high-quality evidence in human studies we can’t pinpoint effective doses, and because CBD is currently is mostly available as an unregulated supplement, it’s difficult to know exactly what you are getting. If you decide to try CBD, talk with your doctor — if for no other reason than to make sure it won’t affect other medications you are taking.

Side effects of CBD include nausea, fatigue and irritability. CBD can increase the level in your blood of the blood thinner coumadin, and it can raise levels of certain other medications in your blood by the exact same mechanism that grapefruit juice does. A significant safety concern with CBD is that it is primarily marketed and sold as a supplement, not a medication. Currently, the FDA does not regulate the safety and purity of dietary supplements. So, you cannot know for sure that the product you buy has active ingredients at the dose listed on the label. In addition, the product may contain other (unknown) elements. We also don’t know the most effective therapeutic dose of CBD for any particular medical condition.

CBD is readily obtainable in most parts of the United States, though its exact legal status is in flux. All 50 states have laws legalizing CBD with varying degrees of restriction, and while the federal government still considers CBD in the same class as marijuana, it doesn’t habitually enforce against it. In December 2015, the FDA eased the regulatory requirements to allow researchers to conduct CBD trials. Currently, many people obtain CBD online without a medical cannabis license. The government’s position on CBD is confusing, and depends in part on whether the CBD comes from hemp or marijuana. The legality of CBD is expected to change, as there is currently bipartisan consensus in Congress to make the hemp crop legal which would, for all intents and purposes, make CBD difficult to prohibit.

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The sample (N = 387) consisted of 61.2% females, mostly between 25 and 54 years old (72.2%) and primarily based in the UK (77.4%). The top 4 reasons for using CBD were self-perceived anxiety (42.6%), sleep problems (42.5%), stress (37%), and general health and wellbeing (37%). Fifty-four per cent reported using less than 50 mg CBD daily, and 72.6% used CBD sublingually. Adjusted logistic models show females had lower odds than males of using CBD for general health and wellbeing [OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.30–0.72] and post-workout muscle-soreness [OR 0.46, 95%CI 0.24–0.91] but had higher odds of using CBD for self-perceived anxiety [OR 1.60, 95% CI 0.02–2.49] and insomnia [OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.13–3.11]. Older individuals had lower odds of using CBD for general health and wellbeing, stress, post-workout sore muscles, anxiety, skin conditions, focusing, and sleep but had higher odds of using CBD for pain. Respondents reported that CBD use was effective for stress, sleep problems, and anxiety in those who used the drug for those conditions.

Self-perceived anxiety was the top-ranked reason for the use of CBD with 42.6% reporting they take CBD for this reason. Of these, 86.5% reported they felt less anxiety. There are biologically plausible reasons for the use of CBD in anxiety. Pharmacological research suggests CBD is a partial 5-HT1a receptor agonist which supports anxiolytic and stress-reducing properties (Russo et al. 2005; Resstel et al. 2009), the activation of which has been associated with anxiolytic, antidepressant, and antipsychotic effects (Zuardi et al. 1993; Bergamaschi et al. 2011; de Faria et al. 2020; Vilazodone for major depressive disorder | MDedge Psychiatry n.d.; Newman-Tancredi and Kleven 2011). CBD also modulates specifically configured GABAA receptors that may be relevant to anxiolytic effects (Bakas et al. 2017; Deshpande et al. 2011). CBD is anxiolytic under experimental conditions in animals, healthy humans and in those with generalised social anxiety disorder (de Faria et al. 2020; Elms et al. 2019; Newman-Tancredi and Kleven 2011) although large clinical trials have not been conducted. Crippa et al. administered an oral dose of 400 mg CBD or placebo, in a double-blind procedure. They found it significantly lowered feelings of anxiety, accompanying changes in limbic areas, in subjects with social anxiety disorder (SAD) (Crippa et al. 2011). Similar results were seen in a small randomised trial using a public speaking test with 600 mg CBD vs placebo (Bergamaschi et al. 2011).

Results

Most people were using less than 100 mg (72.9%) per day. Due to the high price and the lack of medical supervision, it is not surprising that non-medical CBD users are taking much lower doses than those used in clinical studies, and those prescribed for specific medical conditions (Davies and Bhattacharyya 2019; Szaflarski et al. 2018). It is important to highlight that 16.8% reported using more than 100 mg per day, and 10.2% did not know how much CBD they were using. The use of high doses CBD is concerning in light of the current FSA recommendation of restricting the dose to 70 mg CBD per day (Cannabidiol (CBD) n.d.), and it stresses the importance of better public information and communication and improved packaging and guidance from brands to consumers.

In the present study, we found that the largest proportion of respondents used CBD to help with mental health symptoms like perceived anxiety, stress, and sleep problems. This finding aligns with a previous CBD survey that found that anxiety and insomnia were amongst the top 6 reasons for using CBD (Corroon and Phillips 2018). However, Corroon et al. found that the two main reasons for using CBD was arthritis/joint pain and chronic pain, whereas these ranked number six and seven amongst reasons from our respondents. This result may reflect the younger demographics of our sample compared with Corroon et al.

37.5% of respondents reported using CBD for perceived stress, with 92.2% reporting reduced stress levels, making it the third-highest ranking reason for CBD use amongst our sample. Yet, no studies are looking directly at how CBD affects perceived stress levels. This might in part be because stress, apart from post-traumatic stress disorder, is not classified as a disease according to international disease classification (WHO | Burn-out an “occupational phenomenon”: International Classification of Diseases 2019). With more than 12.8 million working days lost because of work-related stress, anxiety, or depression in the UK (Hse 2019), the relationship between CBD and stress is an area of interest for further research. A recent study surveying social media for comments about perceived therapeutic effects of CBD products revealed that the most frequently discussed symptoms, which are not addressed in the research literature, are indeed stress and nausea (Tran and Kavuluru 2020).

BD is the second most common active compound within the marijuana plant. It can be derived in relatively large quantities from hemp to be used for medical treatment. CBD has many potential applications for sufferers of chronic disease.

Promising CBD medical discoveries point to the possibility that it might be useful for a wide range of conditions throughout life. The better doctors come to understand how CBD affects the perception of pain, the easier it will be to prescribe effective and safe doses.

Match to Cannabidiol Clinical Trials

Naturally, there is still much to learn about CBD. No long-term (“longitudinal”) study has shown the effects of CBD on brain structure or quality of life. It will be some time before a large enough patient community exists for a multi-decade CBD clinical study to be completed.

Over the last few years, doctors have launched small-scale CBD studies and CBD clinical trials to find other potential uses for the compound. CBD is gaining notoriety as a potential treatment for a variety of mood disorders, especially generalized anxiety. It may even help PTSD sufferers.

CBD is a substance humans have been in contact with for centuries. However, we know relatively little about its potential applications in modern medicine. Much of the data that exists is for older patients and those who have suffered chronic conditions for many years.