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drugs that interact with cbd oil

The safety profile of CBD is well established with study after study showing that it is well tolerated and safe to use, while at the same time rarely producing any serious side effects. Similarly, CBD is a compound that has a profound impact on a wide variety of systems within the body, which is what makes it such an effective therapeutic agent for so many conditions. But at the same time it is good to remember that it is also this, that is the reason why it has the potential to interact with other drugs and why CBD should be consumed with care and respect.

What this means in plain English is that CBD sort of “outcompetes” other medications when it comes to reaching first place for getting metabolized by the CYP enzymes. This, in essence, means that CBD deactivates the effects of all the other therapeutic compounds that pass through the CYP system.

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This has spurred researchers to investigate whether there are drug–drug interactions (DDIs) and/or adverse drug events (ADEs) between these traditionally used anti-epileptic drugs and CBD. Data showed that, although there were no serious ADEs, deaths, or pregnancies during the trial, most subjects reported some ADEs of mild severity, while 10.4% subjects reported moderate ADEs, and 2.6% subjects reported severe ADEs, with severe events being characterized by popular rashes. Other moderate ADEs included feeling intoxicated, menstrual discomfort or other mild rashes.

In yet another such study, but with researchers this time looking into the clinical implications and importance of DDIs between anticancer agents and CBD in patients with cancer, the reviewers found that there was limited information available, with most of the data coming from in vitro studies and that the true in vivo implications are not well-known. This lead them to believe that erring on the side of caution is the best option, and that doctors and pharmacists should always consider the possibility of interactions and their consequences whenever they are aware of a patient using CBD products.

As mentioned, CBD also has the ability to interact directly with the CYP system in the liver. Preclinical research is showing that the way in which CBD does is by binding to the site where the enzyme activity occurs acting as a “competitive inhibitor”, displacing its chemical competitors, and thus preventing the CYP system from metabolizing other compounds.

In another study investigating the interactions between CBD and commonly used anti-epileptic drugs, concluded that, although serum levels of the drugs topiramate, rufinamide, and N‐desmethylclobazam were found when use in conjunction with and increased CBD dosages. However, all changes were within the accepted therapeutic range but did underscore the importance of monitoring serum AED levels and LFTs during treatment with CBD.

Some mixtures of medications can lead to serious and even fatal consequences.

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Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

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View interaction reports for cannabis and the medicines listed below.

A total of 380 drugs are known to interact with cannabis categorized as 26 major, 354 moderate, and 0 minor interactions.

The easiest way to lookup drug information, identify pills, check interactions and set up your own personal medication records. Available for Android and iOS devices.

Some medications changed by the liver include nicotine, chlormethiazole (Heminevrin), coumarin, methoxyflurane (Penthrox), halothane (Fluothane), valproic acid (Depacon), disulfiram (Antabuse), and others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications changed by the liver include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), ibuprofen (Motrin), meloxicam (Mobic), piroxicam (Feldene), and celecoxib (Celebrex); amitriptyline (Elavil); warfarin (Coumadin); glipizide (Glucotrol); losartan (Cozaar); and others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Children: A prescription cannabidiol product (Epidiolex) is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth in doses up to 25 mg/kg daily. This product is approved for use in certain children 1 year of age and older.

Are there safety concerns?

Some medications changed by the liver include proton pump inhibitors including omeprazole (Prilosec), lansoprazole (Prevacid), and pantoprazole (Protonix); diazepam (Valium); carisoprodol (Soma); nelfinavir (Viracept); and others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C8 (CYP2C8) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.
Some medications changed by the liver include amiodarone (Cordarone), carbamazepine (Tegretol), chloroquine (Aralen), diclofenac (Voltaren), paclitaxel (Taxol), repaglinide (Prandin) and others. Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) substrates) Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Cannabidiol might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. In theory, using cannabidiol along with some medications that are broken down by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before using cannabidiol, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Cannabidiol is POSSIBLY UNSAFE to use if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Cannabidiol products can be contaminated with other ingredients that may be harmful to the fetus or infant. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Parkinson disease: Some early research suggests that taking high doses of cannabidiol might make muscle movement and tremors worse in some people with Parkinson disease.

Some reported side effects of cannabidiol include dry mouth, low blood pressure, light headedness, and drowsiness. Signs of liver injury have also been reported in some patients using higher doses of Epidiolex.