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harvard cbd study

Many Foria fans have already signed up, but the more people who participate, the better the data for this groundbreaking study — so we’ve expanded the study.

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In collaboration with Dr. Staci Gruber, PhD — an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and director of the Marijuana Investigations for Neuroscientific Discovery program at McLean Hospital — this study follows people over the course of two menstrual cycles to determine the potential impact of CBD Suppositories on pain, cramping, and other menstrual symptoms.

To join the study.
Sign up for the study here.

You may or may not have heard, but we’re doing a research study on the efficacy of CBD suppositories, in an effort to find natural & safe alternatives for relief from debilitating menstrual pain.

By now, you’ve probably run into a product containing cannabidiol, also known as CBD. It’s in everything from drinks and pet products to lotions and chewable gummies. Even major drugstore chains have announced they will start carrying CBD products in certain states.

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Experts say cannabidiol products are likely a good choice for some conditions, but evidence is lacking for others.

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But many people still don’t really know what CBD is. Is it marijuana? Is it legal? Does it actually work? Is it safe?

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So far, pharmaceutical CBD is only approved by the FDA as adjunct therapy for the treatment of a special and rare form of epilepsy. Currently, CBD alone is not approved for treatment of pain in the United States. But a combination medication (that contains both THC and CBD in a 1:1 ratio) was approved by Health Canada for prescription for certain types of pain, specifically central neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis, and the treatment of cancer pain unresponsive to optimized opioid therapy. There is currently no high-quality research study that supports the use of CBD alone for the treatment of pain.

If you ask health care providers about the most challenging condition to treat, chronic pain is mentioned frequently. By its nature, chronic pain is a complex and multidimensional experience. Pain perception is affected by our unique biology, our mood, our social environment, and past experiences. If you or a loved one is suffering from chronic pain, you already know the heavy burden.

Why is CBD presented to the public this way, when it is not without risks?

If you or someone close to you is considering trying CBD, I would recommend Dr. Robert Shmerling’s advice about the dos and don’ts in choosing an appropriate product. Until there is high-quality scientific evidence in humans, it is difficult to make a recommendation for the regular use of CBD in chronic pain management.

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Cannabis (most commonly obtained from the Cannabis indica and Cannabis sativa plants) has three major components: cannabinoids, terpenoids, and flavonoids. While there are over a hundred different cannabinoids, the two major components are tetrahydrocannabional (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). Historically more attention has been paid to the psychoactive (euphoric “getting high”) component of the cannabis plant, THC; there have been fewer scientific studies on the medical use of CBD, a non-psychoactive component of the plant.