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how does cbd work in the brain

The way in which our bodies manage oxidative stress plays a huge role in maintaining good health. Oxidative stress is a natural process that happens at a cellular level. When a cell generates energy, it generates free radicals as a waste product. Environmental toxins, such as smog exposure, can also create free radicals.

The brain has protein receptors throughout it that respond to endocannabinoids.

A study by Cheng et al., published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease in 2014, found that long-term CBD treatment “prevents the development of social recognition memory deficits in Alzheimer’s disease transgenic mice.” The researchers also wrote that CBD exerts anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and neuroprotective properties in vitro and in vivo.

2 – CBD Works to Manage Pain

When you consume cannabis, the plant’s cannabinoids bind to the receptors in a manner akin to a key fitting into a lock. The receptors that are affected and parts of the brain that get involved vary from person to person depending on factors such as previous drug use and genetic make-up.

Excitotoxicity is the damage caused when our brain cells become overactive due to excessive stimulation. It can result from traumatic brain injury, stroke, hearing loss, and neurodegenerative diseases of the CNS, including multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer’s.

Our endocannabinoid system (ECS) consists of numerous endocannabinoids; these are neurotransmitters that bind to receptors throughout our CNS and peripheral nervous system. Our ECS helps regulate a variety of cognitive and physiological processes in the body, such as memory, pain, stress response, and appetite.

This benefit relates to CBD’s effects on anandamide. Anandamide was discovered in the 1990s and is a neurotransmitter that can both improve mood while also potentially reducing pain sensitivity.

Inflammation

[7] Larsen C, Shahinas J. Dosage, Efficacy and Safety of Cannabidiol Administration in Adults: A Systematic Review of Human Trials. J Clin Med Res. 2020 Mar;12(3):129–41.

Evidence-based tools to empower you to live a healthier, longer life.

Δ9-THC is known for producing psychoactive effects in the body through the activation of two receptors in the central nervous system called CB1 and CB2.[2,3] The activation of these receptors triggers physiological processes across multiple organ systems, most notably the release of neurotransmitters from the central nervous system that impart the psychoactive effects associated with feeling “high”.[4]

[1] Wheeler M, Merten JW, Gordon BT, Hamadi H. CBD (Cannabidiol) Product Attitudes, Knowledge, and Use Among Young Adults. Subst Use Misuse. 2020 Feb 24;1–8.

Adverse Effects

In contrast, CBD has a significantly less potent effect on the ECS’s receptors. It only binds loosely to CB1 receptors. This action actually blocks the receptors, thus reducing the effects of THC.

There is also a possibility that CBD reduces oxidative stress, which occurs at the cellular level. Cells produce free radicals whenever they generate energy. Environmental toxins also produce this waste product. The body utilizes antioxidants to deal with free radical production and ensure the damage they cause is minimized.

The Difference in How THC & CBD Impact Receptors

CBD is one of over 110 cannabinoids produced by cannabis. It is also abundant in the hemp plant. THC is famed for its ability to cause an intoxicating high. In contrast, CBD is non-intoxicating. Nonetheless, there is evidence that both compounds have possible therapeutic effects. This is part of the reason why CBD for sale is now an exciting proposition.

Relatively few people have heard about the process of excitotoxicity in the brain, yet it plays a huge role in neurodegenerative diseases. It is a term used to describe the damage caused when the brain cells become excessively active due to too much stimulation. Excitotoxicity can happen after a stroke, traumatic brain injury, or even hearing loss.

THC’s effects are akin to those caused by anandamide, nicknamed the ‘bliss’ molecule. It binds to our CB1 receptors, which are responsible for many of the cannabinoid’s intoxicating effects. In fact, THC binds more closely to anandamide’s CB1 receptors than the molecule itself! Anandamide prevents the release of other neurotransmitters, which is part of the reason why we feel a euphoric high after using marijuana.