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how to get cbd oil in alabama

Alabama is known for its incredibly restrictive laws surrounding the use of cannabis, but you’ll be pleased to know that those laws don’t necessarily apply to CBD. Legislature for the use of CBD first passed in Alabama in the year 2014. The law, known as Carly’s Law, made it legal to possess and use CBD. It was expanded on with Leni’s Law in 2016. These two laws made the use of CBD legal for medicinal usage, whether it was derived from marijuana or hemp.

Specifically, hemp-derived CBD helps the endocannabinoid system, an oft overlooked anatomy part that controls a half-dozen functions, including mood, sleep, hormone regulation, appetite, and pain. Still, experts are only just beginning to discover CBD’s biggest potential impact. According to a growing amount of medical research, cannabidiol could reduce, mitigate, or even prevent some of the world’s most pressing health challenges, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, depression, general anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy, and ALS. In short, the more we learn about how CBD works, and how to optimize its health benefits, the more CBD’s popularity will soar, increasing supply, lowering costs, and promoting positive legislation and policies.

Is CBD Legal in Alabama?

Our favorite CBD product can be purchased online for delivery to Alabama:

Birmingham has numerous popular vapes shops where CBD could be available.

If you’d rather not buy CBD oil online, we’re profiled a few popular head and vape shops in Alabama that might carry CBD (or might in the future).

Growers also are subject to existing Alabama code regarding possession, cultivation, sale, or use of cannabis above the legal THC limits. The cultivation or manufacturing of cannabis can result in a sentence of two years to life and a fine of up to a $60,000, depending on the degree of manufacture.

Before the 2018 Farm Bill, Alabama had a budding, though restrictive, medical CBD program in place. On April 1, 2014, Republican Gov. Robert Bentley signed SB 174, known as Carly’s Law, which allowed an affirmative defense for individuals using CBD to treat a debilitating epileptic condition. Patients could receive a prescription for possession or use of CBD only through the University of Alabama-Birmingham. This made access to CBD difficult, as the term “prescribe” is a federal term; most legalized medical marijuana states allow doctors to “recommend” it.

While CBD products with less than 0.3% THC are now broadly legal and available for sale and purchase in Alabama, the ADAI still regulates and licenses industrial hemp growers and processors under the 2014 Farm Bill’s rules. They will continue to operate under the pilot program until the FDA finalizes industrial hemp regulations and reviews and approves the rules submitted by the ADAI.

Cultivation Requirements

In 2018, Congress passed the Farm Bill and legalized hemp cultivation, creating a pathway to remove cannabis from Schedule 1. The Farm Bill defined hemp as cannabis that contains less than 0.3% THC by weight and marijuana as cannabis with more than that amount. Hemp-derived CBD was thus removed from its Schedule 1 designation, but CBD derived from the marijuana plant is still considered federally illegal because of marijuana’s federally illegal status. Hemp is considered an agricultural commodity, but still must be produced and sold under specific federal regulations, which were not finalized when hemp was legalized.

Consumers may also purchase CBD products online, typically directly through a specific brand’s website. Many online checkout processes work for CBD companies based in the United States, but some online processors consider CBD as a “restricted business,” so not all payment methods may be available.

To meet federal legal criteria, CBD oil must contain no more than 0.3 percent THC. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

CBD product labels should not make claims about any therapeutic or medical results, which the FDA would classify as a drug and in violation of current regulations. Reputable CBD companies typically adhere to stricter labeling standards voluntarily to give their consumers better understanding and access to higher-quality products. Buzz words, such as “pure” or “organic,” have no scientific meaning for hemp and could be misleading marketing slogans.