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is cbd oil legal in nc

Nonetheless, let us not forget that since 2014, all states have been granted the right to cultivate and research the industrial hemp variety of the cannabis plant. This, in turn, means that hemp-derived CBD oil is widely available in North Carolina, regardless of its harsh laws on both the medical and recreational use of marijuana.

While North Carolina is far from being a paradise for cannabis enthusiasts, the CBD oil market is growing strong, with more shops popping up in the most important cities.

Where to Buy CBD Oil in North Carolina?

If you can answer “yes” to all these questions, then the company is a keeper. Otherwise, the red light should turn on in your head immediately.

Royal CBD – Full Spectrum

This article lists the best CBD oil stores in North Carolina, and we also clarify the state’s legal framework for cannabis.

Purchasing and possessing CBD products made from industrial hemp is legal across the United States. But only as long as the product contains less than 0.3% THC. The Farm Bill of 2018 is the first piece of federal legislation that legalized the cultivation and processing of industrial hemp. It removed the substance from “The Controlled Substances Act”, reclassifying it as an agricultural commodity. The 2014 Farm Bill allowed research on industrial hemp under strict conditions. Meanwhile, the 2018 Bill legalized the possession and commercialization of CBD oil. In NC, hemp growers need to apply for a license from the state authorities to cultivate the plant.

Even though the Farm Bill legalized industrial hemp across the country, it leaves to each state to decide if they allow it. Officially, if you are not part of the medical program, you can’t legally buy or hold CBD. Yet, law enforcement does not enforce this law half the time! Also, online suppliers ship across the country, including NC. This allowed adults in NC who don’t qualify under North Carolina’s Epilepsy Alternative Treatment Act to purchase and use CBD products. Yet, it’s technically illegal to purchase or use CBD products in NC unless you are in the medical program.

Is CBD Legal In North Carolina? What Are the CBD Laws In NC?

Double-checking the THC content is very important when in North Carolina. If they catch you with CBD products that contain a high THC, you can face jail time. Remember, there are some of the strictest laws in the country.

You should also try full-spectrum CBD products due to how potent their effects are, unlike other types of CBD. Full-spectrum CBD uses the whole plant. Using the whole plant helps capture additional chemical compounds such as flavonoids and terpenes. These compounds help the body to process CBD more efficiently and quickly. You get more health benefits from full-spectrum CBD products than isolate or broad-spectrum CBD.

The first marijuana-related legislation in NC passed in 2014. known as House Bill 1220 or the Epilepsy Alternative Treatment Act. This bill permits the use of hemp extracts to treat various forms of drug-resistant epilepsy in children. The child needs an official diagnosis for drug-resistant epilepsy by a state-recognized neurosurgeon to be eligible for hemp use. The law allows the patient to use hemp or marijuana extracts with less than 0.9% THC and at least 5 percent CBD. Possessing more than 0.5 ounces of marijuana without legal authorization is a misdemeanor in NC.

North Carolina permitted the cultivation and production of hemp under the Industrial Hemp Pilot Program, authorized in 2014. The following year the North Carolina General Assembly passed Senate Bill 313, allowing the Industrial Hemp Commission to create rules and a licensing structure to stay within federal regulations. The law was modified again in 2016 with House Bill 992, which authorized a research program related to hemp.

Broad-spectrum means that the product contains CBD and terpenes, but has undergone additional processes to strip out any THC.

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While medical hemp extract with 0.9% THC is legal in North Carolina, the state has made no provisions for legal sales, leaving patients and caregivers to seek products outside the state.

CBD stands for cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating substance found in cannabis. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

The FDA released guidance on the regulation of cannabis and hemp-derived CBD products in March of 2020. The agency is seeking high-quality, scientific data to help it understand and regulate CBD.