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tn cbd oil

The most difficult part about buying CBD oil online is finding a trusted manufacturer. Amidst the sea of fly-by-night companies offering inferior CBD products, it can be challenging to find a good retailer.

Buying CBD oil online is easy, fast, and convenient. Usually, it takes anywhere from 5 to 10 minutes until you proceed to checkout. But more importantly, you can order CBD oil online from any state in the U.S.

BUYING CBD OIL ONLINE IN TENNESSEE

Generally speaking, the South has always had problems catching up with the Northern states in terms of cannabis legalization. Tennessee has no medical marijuana program, and despite many efforts in 2016, the attempt to legalize medical cannabis ultimately failed.

If you want to make sure that your source of CBD oil can be trusted, check if they meet the following criteria:

Before you discover the best CBD oil retailers in Tennessee, we would like to shed light on the in-state legal intricacies around cannabis and hemp.

The possession of marijuana containing a higher amount of THC is considered illegal. However, both Nashville and Memphis have succeeded in decriminalizing the possession of small amounts of marijuana, treating it like a traffic ticket with a fine of $50, which may be waived by the court if the individual completes community service.

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-intoxicating cannabinoid found in both cannabis and hemp plants. After tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), it is the most abundant compound found in cannabis plants, although CBD derived from hemp usually only contains trace amounts of THC, less than 0.3% by legal definition. CBD is known to have many potential therapeutic benefits, including anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-anxiety, and seizure-suppressing properties.

CBD stands for cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating substance found in cannabis. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

Where can I buy CBD in Tennessee?

In some larger cities such as Memphis and Nashville, there are shops that sell CBD products, including oils, tinctures, infused products, and topicals. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

The Hemp Farming Act of 2018 legalized the cultivation of hemp, and altered the definition of hemp to create a separate, legal pathway for hemp to be removed from the Schedule I category and differentiate from cannabis in the legal definition. Hemp is cannabis that contains less than .3% THC by weight and marijuana is cannabis that contains more than .3% THC. Hemp-derived CBD was declassified from the Controlled Substances Act by the Hemp Farming Act of 2018, but CBD derived from the marijuana plant is still considered illegal at a federal level and is categorized as a Schedule I controlled substance. A helpful explainer is available on the Brookings Institute website.

The possession of half an ounce of marijuana or less elsewhere in the state of Tennessee is considered a misdemeanor, with a fine of up to $250, and up to one year in jail. The possession of more than half an ounce of marijuana is still considered a misdemeanor offense, but the fine increases to $500, with up to one year in jail.

In 2016, Senate Bill 2125 was signed into law. This bill amended the marijuana laws in Tennessee to exclude any cannabis oil, including cannabis flower and seeds, containing less than .6% of THC from the legal definition of marijuana.

Furthermore, cannabis oil itself is still considered a Class I drug by the federal government meaning that using cannabis oil in any state could still put users in violation of federal law. Although, for the time being, the federal government has largely decided to take a hands-off approach to the situation and not enforce the federal prohibition when it conflicts with state laws, there is no guarantee that such an approach will continue into the future.

Tennessee has officially legalized cannabis oil for limited medical reasons. While the law makes possession and use of cannabis oil legal in certain cases for treatment of intractable epilepsy, the legislation appears to open up a legal grey area for Tennessee families. Because marijuana laws are in flux both in Tennessee and throughout the United States, a debate has been sparked over whether Tennesseans who are in compliance with the state’s recently passed legislation could nonetheless be exposing themselves to federal prosecution for marijuana possession. With Tennessee lawmakers already considering another medical marijuana bill, the issue seems unlikely to die anytime soon.

The bill that was recently signed into law by Governor Bill Haslam allows for the use of cannabis oil in Tennessee in order to treat seizures caused by intractable epilepsy. Anybody who wants to use the oil, which is extracted from the marijuana plant, will have to obtain a prescription from a doctor licensed in Tennessee. Although research into cannabis oil’s effectiveness in treating seizures is ongoing, many people, particularly parents of young children suffering from epilepsy, claim that the substance has helped reduce the severity of seizures.

Federal prohibition remains

That requirement already opens up a potentially legal pitfall for families in Tennessee. Within the medical marijuana community, a debate is ongoing about whether people who buy cannabis oil from out-of-state and bring it into Tennessee may be opening themselves up to criminal prosecution. While companies who import cannabis oil into Tennessee say that the federal Farm Bill allows for cannabis oil to be brought over state lines, others insist that the Controlled Substances Act, which prohibits such importation, supersedes the Farm Bill.

One complication of the law, however, is that the legislation does not allow for cannabis oil to be manufactured within Tennessee, meaning anybody who wishes to obtain the substance will have to get it from a state that has legalized its manufacture, such as Colorado.

With the drug law debate ongoing, it can be confusing for most people to know where they stand when charged with a drug offense. For the time being, however, marijuana possession remains a state and federal offense in Tennessee. Anybody who has been charged with any drug offense, including those pertaining to marijuana, should contact a criminal defense attorney immediately in order to understand what the best way to respond to such charges may be.