What Is The Lds Church Stand On CBD Oil

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SALT LAKE CITY — In a new statement issued Friday, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints clarified its stance on two competing pieces of medical marijuana legislation being considered by Utah lawmakers. “While we are not in a position to evaluate specific medical claims, the Church underst SALT LAKE CITY — Reaction is pouring in after The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints released a legal analysis of the medical marijuana ballot initiative in Utah, and one active member of the LDS Church whose son is terminally ill read the memo and is confused about why the church is holdin

LDS Church issues new statement on medical marijuana

SALT LAKE CITY — In a new statement issued Friday, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints clarified its stance on two competing pieces of medical marijuana legislation being considered by Utah lawmakers.

“ While we are not in a position to evaluate specific medical claims, the Church understands that there are some individuals who may benefit from the medical use of compounds found in marijuana. For that reason, although the Church opposes SB 73, it has raised no objection to SB 89. These two competing pieces of legislation take very different approaches when it comes to issues like access, distribution, control and the potential harm of the hallucinogenic compound, THC,” the statement said.

Senate Bill 73, sponsored by Sen. Mark Madsen, R-Saratoga Springs, would allow so-called “whole plant” cannabis usage for qualifying patients. Madsen clarified that the bill would only allow medicinal cannabis to be used in forms like oils and gummies. Madsen has said in the past that smoking marijuana would remain illegal.

Senate Bill 89, sponsored by Sen. Evan Vickers, R-Cedar City, and Rep. Brad Daw, R-Orem, would allow medicinal cannabis consumers to use an extract with trace amounts of THC, the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis.

The bills are expected to be debated on the Senate floor next week.

Read the entire statement issued February 12, 2016 by the LDS Church:

While we are not in a position to evaluate specific medical claims, the Church understands that there are some individuals who may benefit from the medical use of compounds found in marijuana. For that reason, although the Church opposes SB 73, it has raised no objection to SB 89. These two competing pieces of legislation take very different approaches when it comes to issues like access, distribution, control and the potential harm of the hallucinogenic compound, THC.

In addition to the therapeutic, treatment, and control questions, there are several other important issues to be resolved. At the forefront is that the use of medical marijuana is still illegal under federal law. We agree with groups such as the American Medical Association, who have said (see the AMA policy below) that further study is warranted before significant public policy decisions on marijuana are advanced. For these reasons, the Church urges a cautious approach.

American Medical Association Policy – H-95.952 Cannabis for Medicinal Use

(1) Our AMA calls for further adequate and well-controlled studies of marijuana and related cannabinoids in patients who have serious conditions for which preclinical, anecdotal, or controlled evidence suggests possible efficacy and the application of such results to the understanding and treatment of disease. (2) Our AMA urges that marijuana’s status as a federal schedule I controlled substance be reviewed with the goal of facilitating the conduct of clinical research and development of cannabinoid-based medicines, and alternate delivery methods. This should not be viewed as an endorsement of state-based medical cannabis programs, the legalization of marijuana, or that scientific evidence on the therapeutic use of cannabis meets the current standards for a prescription drug product. (3) Our AMA urges the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to develop a special schedule and implement administrative procedures to facilitate grant applications and the conduct of well-designed clinical research involving cannabis and its potential medical utility. This effort should include: a) disseminating specific information for researchers on the development of safeguards for cannabis clinical research protocols and the development of a model informed consent form for institutional review board evaluation; b) sufficient funding to support such clinical research and access for qualified investigators to adequate supplies of cannabis for clinical research purposes; c) confirming that cannabis of various and consistent strengths and/or placebo will be supplied by the National Institute on Drug Abuse to investigators registered with the DEA who are conducting bona fide clinical research studies that receive FDA approval, regardless of whether or not the NIH is the primary source of grant support. (4) Our AMA believes that effective patient care requires the free and unfettered exchange of information on treatment alternatives and that discussion of these alternatives between physicians and patients should not subject either party to criminal sanctions.(CSA Rep. 10, I-97; Modified: CSA Rep. 6, A-01; Modified: CSAPH Rep. 3, I-09; Modified in lieu of Res. 902, I-10; Reaffirmed in lieu of Res. 523, A-11; Reaffirmed in lieu of Res. 202, I-12; Reaffirmed: CSAPH Rep. 2, I-13)

Copyright 2022 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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LDS father who uses CBD oil to treat son reacts to church’s stance on medical marijuana ballot initiative

SALT LAKE CITY — Reaction is pouring in after The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints released a legal analysis of the medical marijuana ballot initiative in Utah, and one active member of the LDS Church whose son is terminally ill read the memo and is confused about why the church is holding such a strong stance.

“My faith in God has only grown understanding how cannabis works in our body,” Dave Cromar said.

Through prayer and revelation, Cromar says he was guided to medical marijuana four years ago to help his then 7-year-old son, who suffers from epilepsy.

“It’s the first time we found true success and healing in our son,” Cromar said.

So Cromar moved his family from Utah to Colorado to legally get CBD oil for his son. He said he was overwhelmed with support from fellow LDS members as well as his local leaders in Colorado.

“Our stake president in Colorado said, ‘I’m a cancer survivor and I wish I had that option when I was going through all that,’” Cromar said.

When CBD oil was legalized in Utah his family moved back, but he says there’s a stark contrast in how he is treated.

“I was just blown away,” he said. “I don’t know what the issue is with it specific to Utah.”

Friday, the LDS Church released its most detailed argument yet for why Utah should not legalize medical marijuana using the current ballot initiative. The analysis outlined 31 results that the LDS Church said “raises grave concerns.”

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According the analysis conducted by a law firm in Salt Lake City, those concerns include allowing people to grow their own marijuana, creating significant challenges for law enforcement, allowing dispensaries to give free samples, allowing minors to use medical marijuana, requiring science to be ignored, and concerns that large numbers of Utahns will likely qualify for medical cannabis cards.

Those behind the medical marijuana ballot initiative say they respect opinions of those who disagree but say the initiative, “…ensures that those who need this God-given plant for medicinal purposes can use it without fear of criminal punishment.”

But now some LDS Church members like Cromar are left with questions for church leaders.

“I would like to know these statements that you’re making, are they coming from revelation or are they just pure opposition to legal issues, or where is this coming from? This isn’t doctrine so what is it?” Cromar said.

The ballot initiative appears to have secured enough signatures to be placed on the November ballot, but the Lt. Gov. must officially certify which ballot initiatives were successful by May 15.

Copyright 2022 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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