Posted on

what to do with cbd oil

It can, but it probably won’t. While some people do feel that CBD oil makes them feel more alert, preliminary studies have shown that CBD oil is an effective way to treat insomnia.

If you’re feeling fancy go on the hunt for a CBD cocktail. We’ve heard reports that over in San Diego you can order The Mr Nice Guy – that’s a vodka and mezcal mixed drink that includes CBD. More proof, if any were needed, that CBD can be imbibed alongside any other food or drink, and that you’re going to be seeing a whole lot more of it soon.

In balm or rub form, CBD is often blended with fragrant coconut oil or beeswax, which makes it easy to spread on the skin (and makes your bod smell great too). When used topically, CBD can reach local targets, like sore muscles or joints. We’ve also heard it works wonders for period pain.

Should I Take CBD Oil in the Morning or Evening?

Okay so this one might sound a little scary, but vape pens are easy to use and can go undetected because they produce little smoke. The plus side of taking CBD in a vape pen is that when CBD is inhaled, it enters the lungs where it rapidly passes into the bloodstream. However, it’s important to note that the long-term safety of vaping is still unknown.

So, you’ve read all about cannabidiol (or CBD as it’s more commonly known) and now you’re thinking of giving it a whirl. It makes sense. The food and wellness industries are buzzing about this natural chemical compound, which is said to help with anxiety, arthritis, pain relief, menopause symptoms and insomnia to name but a few.

No, you shouldn’t. It’s best kept in a dark place like a pantry or cupboard so that it stays cool without getting too cold.

Whichever you prefer! As outlined above, you can add CBD oil to a variety of different drinks or rub it into your skin as a topical balm. However, rubbing it into your skin tends to be better for sore joints or muscles.

When taken orally, CBD oil takes a while to work, approximately between 15 and 30 minutes, and it can trigger effects that last more than a few hours. As mentioned earlier, it is a question of personal preference and desired effect.

Choosing a specific form of CBD oil depends on various factors, e.g. your optimal dose, your personal conditions, the results you want to achieve, or how long the effect should last. That is why there is no general rule regarding the use of CBD oil products.

How should CBD oil be used?

First, take low doses of CBD oil and attentively observe the resulting effects.

It has been shown that a synthetic isolated CBD molecule is not nearly as effective as the naturally occurring molecule in the plant, which makes the opinion on CBD oil very positive.

If cannabis is not allowed in your country or state and you are using CBD oil from cannabis, you may be in trouble. On the contrary, CBD oil from hemp is much more accessible in this regard and you will surely get more health benefits from this oil.

If you are thinking about using CBD oil to treat a health condition, be sure to speak with your healthcare provider to ensure that it is the right option for you.

Here are a few tips to help you find the best CBD oil:

CBD oil comes as full-spectrum oils or in forms that contain CBD isolates. Unlike isolates, which contain CBD only, full-spectrum oils contain a variety of compounds found naturally in the cannabis plant, including proteins, flavonoids, terpenes, and chlorophyll. Alternative practitioners believe these compounds offer more substantial health benefits, although there is no clear evidence of this.

Interactions

CBD oil may benefit those with drug addiction, suggests a 2015 review of studies published in Substance Abuse.

Human studies evaluating the use of CBD in treating chronic pain are lacking. Those that do exist almost invariably include THC, making it difficult to isolate CBD’s distinct effects.

Clinical research has shown that CBD oil can trigger side effects. Severity and type can vary from one person to the next.

Meredith Bull, ND, is a licensed naturopathic doctor with a private practice in Los Angeles. She helped co-author the first integrative geriatrics textbook, "Integrative Geriatric Medicine."